Dog Routine Immunization

Puppy:

6-8 Weeks:

·        DAPP (Distemper, Adenovirus, Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus)

·        Fecal Test and Deworm

·        Heartworm and Flea/Tick Prevention

10-12 Weeks:

·        DAPP

·        2nd Deworm

·        Leptospirosis Vaccine

14-16 Weeks:

·        DAPP

·        Leptospirosis Vaccine

·        Rabies Vaccine

·        Kennel Cough (Bordetellosis) Vaccine

6 Month: Spay/Neuter

Adult Dog:

1.      Annual Physical Examination

2.      Annual Blood Test and Parasite Test

·        Test for Liver and Kidney Functions

·        Bi-annual Fecal Test

*Roundworm is common in Canines and can be passed on to human.

3.      Heartworm and Flea/Tick Prevention

4.      Vaccines:

·        Annual DAPP

·        Annual Leptospirosis

·        Annual Bordetellosis

·        Rabies booster at one year of age; Rabies every 3 years



Cat Routine Immunization

6-8 Weeks:

·        Rhinotacheitis/Calicivirus/Chlamydophilia/Panlekopenia (Feline    distemper-RCCP)FvRCCP

·        Recommended FELV/FIV Test for stray cats

·        Fecal Test and Deworm

·        Heartworm and Flea/Tick Prevention

10-12 Weeks:

  • FvRCCP

·        Recommended FELV Vaccine if the cat is kept outside

·        2nd Deworm

14-16 Weeks:

  • FvRCCP

·        Recommended FELV Vaccine if the cat is kept outside

·        Rabies Vaccine

·        Fecal Test

6 Month: Neuter/Spay

1 Year:

  • FvRCCP

·        Recommended FELV Vaccine if the cat is kept outside

·        Rabies Vaccine

·        Fecal Test

Adult Cat:

·        Annual FvRCCP

·        Rabies booster at one year of age; Rabies every 3 years


General Anesthetics

General anesthetic is required for teeth cleaning and surgeries. The process is as follows:

1.     Pre-anesthesia medication: usually mild sedative, given through intramuscular injection, can calm the animal down.

2.     Induced anesthesia: intravenous injection, takes about 5 to 10 minutes, makes it easier to perform trachea cannula.

3.      Continuous anesthesia: inhalational anesthetics, I use isoflurane, the depth of anesthetic can be controlled, patients wakes up faster, usually around 5 minutes.

4.      Blood oxygen saturation and heart rate are monitored throughout the entire anesthesia process.

Only a small amount of isoflurane is discharged through kidney, 99% are discharged through the respiratory tract. It is usually safe for young pets (6 years of age). For older animals, tests are conducted on liver and kidney function, if the results are within the acceptable range; it is safe to use inhalational anesthetics. Of course, all methods of anesthesia have risks, but the chance is fairly low.

Classification of Vaccines

In Canada, vaccines are classified into core vaccines (made mandatory by the government) and non-core vaccines (for diseases that only occur in certain circumstances, or areas of the country). Core vaccines for dogs include DAPP (Distemper, Adenovirus, Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus) and rabies; Cats need FvRCCP (Rhinotacheitis/Calicivirus/Chlamydophilia/Panlekopenia ) and rabies. Non-core vaccines for dogs are Leptospirosis vaccine, Bordetellosis vaccine etc.; cats’ include Feline leukemia, Feline AIDS, Feline infectious peritonitis, etc.

The organism that causes leptospirosis belongs in a group of spiral organisms called spirochetes. They are similar to ordinary bacteria in many ways. Pets can become infected by sniffing contaminated urine. More often, the leptospira are washed by rains into standing water. Then pets wading, swimming or drinking the contaminated water, develop the disease. Although this is the way that leptospira usually pass from animal to animal, they can also enter through a bite wound or through the pets eating infected materials. It could be passed on to human and cause miscarriage.

Kennel cough, or Infectious Tracheobronchitis, is usually caused by Bordetellabronchiseptica. Dogs "catch" kennel cough when they inhale bacteria or virus particles into their respiratory tract. The classic symptom of kennel cough is a persistent, forceful cough. This is distinct from a cough-like sound made by some dogs. If your dog has kennel cough, he probably will not lose his appetite or have a decreased energy level.


Canine Vomit and diarrhea

At some point, every dog owner has to deal with a dog that vomits and/or has diarrhea. Dogs are anatomically and physiologically built to deal with the occasional dietary indiscretion. Because dogs evolved from omnivorous canines that often scavenged for food, their gastrointestinal systems are ready to clean themselves out whenever the feeling arises that the last meal might have been a mistake.

Not every episode of vomiting or diarrhea warrants an immediate trip to the veterinarian. If the episode is mild, not progressing rapidly and your dog is an otherwise healthy adult, it is reasonable to try some at-home remedies first. Of course, if your dog’s condition fails to improve over the course of 24 to 48 hours or worsens at any point, call your veterinarian.  For vomiting, withhold food but not water for 12 to 24 hours, and then gradually reintroduce your dog’s regular diet. For diarrhea, do not withhold food or water, but switch to a bland, easily digested diet for a couple of days. White rice mixed with boiled white meat chicken (no bones or skin) is a good, temporary option. Once stools return to normal, gradually switch back to your dog’s regular, nutritionally balanced food. Anti-diarrheal medications that contain kaolin and pectin can be used to absorb excess fluid within the intestinal tract and reduce intestinal movement. Probiotic supplements also help to normalize bacterial populations within the intestinal tract.


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